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Health Notes from Dartmouth-Hitchcock: Students learn signs of mental illness


October 23. 2017 9:21PM


You may have heard about the five signs of emotional suffering through Change Direction, a national organization dedicated to changing the culture surrounding mental illness. Now, Dartmouth-Hitchcock (D-H) is giving kids the tools to R.E.A.C.T.

In partnership with the New Hampshire Department of Education, the R.E.A.C.T. awareness initiative offers students tips to deal with signs of emotional suffering, and directs them to resources for support and help.

New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut is the first commissioner in the country to focus on mental health awareness in schools, and recently Commissioner Edelblut spoke enthusiastically about this new collaboration with D-H in an interview with Jack Heath of WGIR Radio.

You can listen to the interview at http://dartmouth-hitchcock.org/podcasts/media/wgir-Edelblut.mp3.

Edelblut has joined D-H Senior Director of Public Affairs John Broderick at a number of New Hampshire high schools to present the R.E.A.C.T. initiative.

Broderick has been reaching out to high school students, parents and professionals across New Hampshire to help change the conversation on mental health.

“You are the least judgmental generation in the history of this country,” Broderick recently told a packed auditorium of high school students. “You have the ability to change the culture and the way mental health is viewed.”

His presentations draw a powerful reaction from students, as the majority of them stand when Broderick asks if mental illness had touched their own lives.

“We are making a difference,” Edelblut said. “With the great support of Dartmouth-Hitchcock, we will continue to enhance the mental health and well-being of our children. We are giving our kids the tools they need to address a problem that touches countless families.”

Broderick noted that the R.E.A.C.T. posters are in the process of being posted in every public school in New Hampshire, and very soon the campaign will expand into Vermont public schools.


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