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Benghazi, forgotten: Never this President’s priority

Last week America marked the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks and the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the American consulate in Benghazi. Four Americans died in Benghazi, and a month later President Obama said of the killers, “my biggest priority now is bringing those folks to justice, and I think the American people have seen that’s a commitment I’ll always keep.”

A year later we see that the President is as committed to justice for the Benghazi four as O.J. Simpson was to finding his wife’s “real killer.”

On Sept. 9, The New York Times ran a story on the administration’s lack of progress in its supposed pursuit of justice. “Some military and law enforcement officials have grown frustrated with what they believe is the White House’s unwillingness to pressure the Libyan government to make the arrests or allow American forces to do so, according to current and former senior government officials,” the Times reported.

The President of the United States has more resources at his disposal than any other human being on the planet. We know who the suspects are. We know where they are. One has sat for several TV interviews. If bringing them to justice were Obama’s “biggest priority,” it would have been done by now.

Americans wonder whether justice for four dead countrymen is a priority at all.

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