Welcome guest, you have 2 views left. | Register | Sign In
 Contests
 Readers' Choice
 Movie times
 Property Transfers
 Auctions
 Restaurant reviews
action:article | category:NEWS13 | adString:NEWS13 | zoneID:7

Home » News » Avenues

AVENUES PARTNERS:
NH homes for sale

Search MLS

Courtesy of


Type:
Residential
Condominium
Multi Family
Land
Mobile Home
Commercial
Rentals

Towns & cities:
Price:
Low:   $
High:   $
Villages:

Locate open houses

Search By MLS #

Classifieds


 ♦ REAL ESTATE
 ♦ APARTMENTS
 ♦ HOME SERVICES
 ♦ MERCHANDISE

Click to place free online ad for items valued under $500.

Opinion

June 28. 2013 7:37PM

Londonderry taxes on Woodmont could hit $5M in 20 years

An analysis of Woodmont Commons, the 300-acre village community being proposed alongside Interstate 93 in Londonderry, suggests the project could bring in annual tax revenues of more than $5 million once it reaches the 20-year buildout.

During the latest in a series of many public hearings, Lucy Gallo, principal with the Development Planning and Finance Group (DPFG), shared details of the project's recently completed fiscal impact analysis during Wednesday night's Londonderry Planning Board meeting.

Attorney Ari Pollack, who represents project developers Pillsbury Realty Development, LLC, said the development team would be back before the Planning Board on July 10.

During next month's meeting, the developers plan on discussing the site's development standards, and Pollack said he's hoping "to have some action taken that night."

Gallo, whose firm was tasked with analyzing the projected financial impacts in the coming years, as well as determine what effects Woodmont Commons could have on the town's general fund, said the team took a multi-faceted approach to gathering its data.

"We're taking a particular look at the town's general fund because we know that most elected officials are interested in the impact this potential land use change would have on property tax rates," she said.

Using the town's 2013 budget information, including current property tax rates and trends as well as current commercial market values, the analysis also incorporated information provided by town and school officials.

"We know Londonderry, like many communities, is heavily dependent on residential tax base," Gallo said. "Woodmont would hopefully lesson the burden on residential tax."

Results from the analysis suggest the rate of new employees flocking to Woodmont Commons for their jobs would likely grow faster than the population.

Once the site reaches its 20-year buildout, the project is expected to bring 3,600 more residents to Londonderry, along with 3,800 commuting employees.

"I don't think this would surprise anyone as the live, work and play components of this project are very attractive to the market," Gallo said.

While it's difficult to determine the revenue level year to year, Gallo said the goal was to make "reasonable assumptions" though admitted the commercial development "wouldn't happen overnight."

"It's premature at this point to predict any one particular year's results," she said.

Town officials said the police, fire, building department, recreation and community development departments, along with the library and the school district, would be most sensitive to growth.

"Unlike many other communities, Londonderry's school district has availability for expansion right now, both in its operating budget and its space availability," Gallo countered.

Local school tax revenues are expected to generate "about a $7 million net surplus" once Woodmont Commons reaches its build-out, according to Gallo.

Overall, annual town-wide expenditures from Woodmont Commons are expected to increase by $3.7 million, with about a third of those costs attributed to anticipated fire and emergency needs.

Several town officials attending Wednesday night's meeting expressed some concerns.

Assistant Public Works Director John Trottier said the town lacks the "minimal equipment" needed to perform summer and winter maintenance in an urban setting like Woodmont Commons.

He further noted that the fiscal analysis presented "doesn't seem to address the impact of sanitary waste and its disposal."

"This type of development is very different from what Londonderry presently supports and could prove costly when it comes providing services in a much denser, more urban environment," Trottier said. "Plus we don't know how many of these roads will be public roads, or who will be maintaining the street lights, the grass strips in the middle of the roads. So there are a number of unknowns right now."

Board Chairman Arthur Rugg agreed.

"Right now, we have a lot of initial assumptions," he said. "This makes the whole process very, very difficult."

aguilmet@newstote.com




Real Estate

An exterior view of St. Charles Church in Dover.

St. Charles Church in Dover to be torn down

Peterborough church plan advances after land buy

Manchester zoning may be slowing housing market

A 50-acre portion of Rockingham Park that has gone unused for years could soon be sold to local developer Joseph Faro.

Part of Rockingham Park may be sold

Derry housing complex can apply for CDBG grant

Home & Garden

Subdivision road work in Salem under scrutiny

READER COMMENTS: 0

The issue came up recently when residents of the Deerfield Street subdivision wrote to selectmen asking for help in getting their road completed.

Bedford planners give final OK to elderly housing development

READER COMMENTS: 0

The Planning Board voted unanimously on Monday night in favor of a request for final approval of a five-unit, detached elderly housing development at 99 Pulpit Road.

Danville stonemason John Wilder has been working with rocks since childhood. “The longer you do it, the better at it you get,” he said.

Danville stonemason John Wilder sees potential in every rock

READER COMMENTS: 0

John Wilder can just look at a rock and know what to do with it. He knows where it goes, knows if it's any good, knows its limits. But more importantly, he knows all that humble rock could be.

Artist Tafi Brown of Alstead shows off one of her smaller pieces of cyanotype quilting. This piece was created from a photo of  the Alstead library. Her pieces typically tell a story or reflect what she is feeling when she makes them.

A potter transformed: Tafi Brown took an unplanned turn to cyanotype quilting

READER COMMENTS: 0

For years, Tafi Brown’s path led to pottery, until one day while at a random workshop, she discovered quilting. And now, for nearly 40 years she has been making cyanotype art quilts.

Firefighters could not stop flames from burning the Woodshed restaurant to the ground on Nov. 28.

Comeback planned for landmark Lakes Region restaurant

READER COMMENTS: 1

The Woodshed Restaurant in Moultonborough, which burned to the ground in a Thanksgiving night fire, is coming back in the form of an 1810 barn that will be moved to the site.

The farm stand at the Devriendt family's 178 South Mast Road property is currently filled with fall harvest produce. Summer crops, like tomatoes, are also still available, says owner Lea Devriendt.

Land buy allows Devriendt Farm to expand, evolve

READER COMMENTS: 0

Devriendt Farm, located at 178 South Mast Road in Goffstown, is preparing to expand onto a nearby 140-acre property, the latest evolution of the family-owned business.

A newly renovated kitchen designed by Meagan Collins of Goedecke Decorating Center in Bedford shows cleaner lines in the transitional decorating trend. Every space is used to add storage for spices, utensils and every day items.

Decorating trends: Transitional style blends traditional and contemporary

READER COMMENTS: 0

If you want to give your home an updated and timeless look, consider transitional style — an interior designing trend that blends classic traditional and contemporary looks.

Windham may auction off unused properties

READER COMMENTS: 0

The Windham board of selectmen will meet again in November to finalize details on the future sale of unused town lands.

Double amputee Iraq War veteran Matt DeWitt and his fiancee, Catrina Peck, stand outside their new home in Hopkinton with sons Levi and Reed. The specially adapted home was donated by Homes for Our Troops, and on Saturday, volunteers gathered to landscape the property.

Community comes together to work on custom dream home for NH veteran's family

READER COMMENTS: 0

A local military family is one step closer to having their dream home ready, thanks to the help of a non-profit organization dedicated to providing custom houses for veterans, the Home Depot, a...

After learning embroidery as a child, Rhonda Besaw of Whitefield began doing beadwork in 1996, which opened her eyes to the rich handcraft traditions of her ancestors.

Whitefield artist's beadwork is a tribute to her Native American ancestry

READER COMMENTS: 0

Rhonda Besaw specializes in traditional and contemporary Wabanaki beadwork.