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Enhanced 911 asks Epping to change street names after some confusion

EPPING - Officials with the state's Enhanced 911 system have asked the town to change similar road names to avoid confusion for operators and emergency personnel.

The town made some name changes and renumbered streets when the state began using the 911 system several years ago, but trouble spots remain.

Local officials plan to work with the state to address the issues over duplicate names and field crews from the state's Bureau of Emergency Communications are also expected to visit the town soon to create GPS points that will improve its mapping system. Duplicate road names are the biggest problem, according to Kenny-Lynn Dempsey, a field representative with the state's Bureau of Emergency Communications.

'What happens is a call can come in and (emergency personnel) may possibly go to the wrong area, causing a significant delay in response,' Dempsey said at a meeting with selectmen last week.

The most recent incident happened Aug. 21 when emergency crews were trying to find a residence on Folsom Lane. It took 21 minutes to respond because the ambulance went to another street named Folsom Avenue, according to Tim Scott, data operations manager for the Bureau of Emergency Communications.

Scott said the town has four streets with Folsom in the name. In one case, a sign reads Folsom Drive, but the mailing address is Folsom Lane. The town also has a Folsom Avenue and a Folsom Mill Lane that is spelled Folson Mill Road on the street sign.

'There are a few instances in town like this where the road names cause confusing issues,' Scott said.

Selectman Robert Jordan has had first-hand experience with duplicate street names and a delayed emergency response.

Jordan recalled a medical call at his house on Lamprey Village Court about five years ago that created confusion because there was also a Lamprey Village Drive and a Lamprey Lane.

Changing street names and renumbering may inconvenience residents, but Selectman Karen Falcone said it's necessary.

'It is a hardship, but not as much of a hardship as needing an ambulance and not having it come to your home,' she said...

        

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